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Dr Martin Bootman

Profile summary

Externally funded projects

Optimising a novel co-culture system to study cardiomyocyte-epicardial adipocyte interactions
RoleStart dateEnd dateFunding source
Co-investigator01 Feb 201831 Jan 2019The Biochemical Society

‘The Biochemical Society’s Eric Reid Fund for methodological development. The grant is to optimise development of a functional coculture of adipocytes and cardiomyocytes.’

Development of a proangiogenic tissue matrix regenerative scaffold
RoleStart dateEnd dateFunding source
Lead01 Jul 201630 Jun 2019Regenero Consorcio Regenero

Creation and development of a fibrin-based pro-angiogenic tissue matrix type scaffold. The goal is optimise the strutcure of the material to support mesenchymal stem cell pro-angiogenic and immuno-modulatory function for dermal and connective tissue reconstruction of chronic ulcers. The project involves a collaboration between the OU, the Institute of Biomedical Engineering at UCL (UCL IBME) and Cells for Cells, a Chilean Cell therapy company (C4C) spun out from University of Los Andes (UANDES) managed by a grant adminstration compay, Regenero.

Altered calcium homeostasis in Crohn's Disease
RoleStart dateEnd dateFunding source
Lead01 Oct 201530 Sep 2019Fraser McDonald;MRC Human Nutrition Research (MRC HNR)

This is a collaborative project with the MRC Human Nutrition Research Unit in Cambridge. They have a long-standing interest in understanding how peptidoglycans released by bacteria in the gut lead to dampening of immune responses. The current hypothesis suggests that the peptidoglycans are transported across the gut wall through specialized uptake cells because they are encased in a calcium-phosphate matrix. Following their transport across the gut wall, the peptidoglycan/calcium-phosphate nanoparticles are endocytosed by white blood cells that consequently express a death receptor ligand. This study will investigate the role of the mineral component of the peptidoglycan/calcium-phosphate nanoparticles, and examine whether Crohn's patients have a different response to normal, in that they cannot process the calcium deposit and it leads to abnormal cell function.

Altered Calcium Homeostasis In Crohn's Disease
RoleStart dateEnd dateFunding source
Lead01 Oct 201531 Jul 2021Fraser McDonald

This is a collaborative project with the MRC Human Nutrition Research Unit in Cambridge. They have a long-standing interest in understanding how peptidoglycans released by bacteria in the gut lead to dampening of immune responses. The current hypothesis suggests that the peptidoglycans are transported across the gut wall through specialized uptake cells because they are encased in a calcium-phosphate matrix. Following their transport across the gut wall, the peptidoglycan/calcium-phosphate nanoparticles are endocytosed by white blood cells that consequently express a death receptor ligand. This study will investigate the role of the mineral component of the peptidoglycan/calcium-phosphate nanoparticles, and examine whether Crohn's patients have a different response to normal, in that they cannot process the calcium deposit and it leads to abnormal cell function. (This record is supplementary to AMS record 171480 which covers the original studentship. Due to the withdrawal of a second student, we are recruiting a third - Fraser McDonald has agreed to fund the 1 year stipend shortfall at £14,553).

Characterising The Response Of Foamy Alveolar Macrophages To Inhaled Drug Particulates - Phase II
RoleStart dateEnd dateFunding source
Lead16 Jan 201515 Jan 2018NC3Rs (National Centre for the Replacement Refinement and Reduction of Animals in Research)

Lung diseases such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) affect the lives of millions of people in the UK. Whilst the number of patients diagnosed with lung disease increases each year, the treatments available have changed very little over the past 30 years, despite large investment from pharmaceutical companies for the development of new treatments. One of the main reasons that many new medicines have not reached the market is the limited understanding of how the immune system in the lungs responds to the inhalation of therapeutic drug powders. Additionally, current methods used to test the safety of new inhaled medicines, rely on animal models which may not accurately predict safety in humans. Regulatory bodies are therefore unable to approve new medicines that appear to sensitise the immune system in animal models, despite not knowing fully if these observations are adverse in human patients. This project aims to better characterise inflammatory responses in the lung to inhaled medicines. Commercially available cell based models of the lung will be used, and imaging, biological and analytical tools will be employed to determine the reactions to inhaled medicines. The ultimate goal will be to use non-animal methods to provide an in depth understanding of the immune responses in the lung to reduce the numbers of animal experiments required to achieve an accurate prediction of the safety of new inhaled medicines in humans.